In the Fall of 2010 , I teach two courses.  Please click on the course that interests you:

HIST / SMF 317: History of Sexuality: Premodern

HIST 402A & B: Medieval Europe aka Law, Love, and Lies: Approaches to Late Medieval Social History

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HIST 260: Europe, 410 - 1303
Tuesday lecture 9:30 - 11:30; Thursday tutorial 10:30 - 11:30
STJ 2011

Course Description

Course Materials

Documentary Analysis Files

Grade Breakdown

Expectations and Goals

Written Assignments

Academic Honesty

Grading Scale

Deadlines
Illness and Missed Tests
Special Needs

Steven Bednarski, Instructor
Tyler Chamilliard, Assistant

Office:                    SJU 3010C
Office Hour:          Tuesdays 4:30 – 5:30 or by appointment
E-mail *:                 stevenb@uwaterloo.ca
Web:                      www.medieval-tech.com
Telephone:           (519) 884-8110 x 28276

* Please note that the instructor replies to e-mail within 48 hrs., Monday through Friday.  E-mail is, therefore, a convenient way to communicate during the week but it should not be relied upon in an emergency or when deadlines are pressing.

 

SCHEDULE: Tuesday 9:30 – 11:20, STJ 2011
          Thursday 10:30 – 11:20, STJ 2011

Course Description:

Students in HIST 260 will study of the evolution of European society, circa 410 to 1303. Against a background of the decline of Roman imperial power and the establishment of the barbarian kingdoms, the course traces the growth of medieval economic, social, political, religious and judicial institutions. It focuses on the nature of kingship and the law, so-called “feudal” institutions, the growth of the papacy and the evolution of monasticism, the birth of universities, and such social institutions as marriage and the family.  The course ends with the fourteenth-century crisis.

Course Materials:

Peters, Edward. Europe and the Middle Ages.  Fourth Edition. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall, 2004.

This is the standard university textbook for survey courses on the Middle Ages. The book is available new from the university bookstore and retails for about eighty dollars.  Used copies, however, are also widely available.  Some students may wish to obtain an older edition.  In most cases, this will not pose a difficulty for the course material.

                HIST 260 Course Package

This bound set of legally photocopied readings is available at the UW bookstore.  The price is dictated in large part by the constraints imposed by the Canada Copyright Act.

In addition to the textbook and course kit, the instructor will provide links to online primary sources throughout the term.

Documentary Analysis Files

1. Selections from Nennius’ Historia Brittonum

2. Selections from Usma h Ibn Munqidh’s autobiography, excerpts on the Franks


Grade Breakdown:

Participation                        10 %
Midterm Exam                     15 %                      
Document Analysis              15 %
Final Exam                          30 %
Final Essay                         30 %

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Important Course Dates:

22 Jan.             Last day to drop with no penalty
12 Feb.             Documentary Analysis due
15 – 19 Feb.      Reading week (no classes)
19 Feb.             Last day for 50% tuition refund
23 Feb.             Mid-term exam
30 Mar.             Final essay due

1 Apr.               Last class for HIST 304

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Expectations and Goals:

The basic requirement for participation is attendance and, in HIST 260, attendance is mandatory.  The instructor takes attendance each class.  Students who do not attend 80% of the classes have not adequately participated in the course and may, consequently, be denied the credit.

Students, moreover, must fulfill all the course requirements in order to receive credit for HIST 260.  This not only includes attendance at lectures and tutorials but also all written assignments and examinations.

The participation grade is derived from:

  1. Weekly class attendance

  2. Attendance at one of the two mandatory seminars which are part of the UW Medieval Studies lecture series.

 

The instructor will announce the dates for these seminars during the term.

History 260 is a survey course.  It covers a lengthy and significant period in Western development.  This period spans many different regions and cultures, and reflects the deeds and thoughts of many individuals.  In short, the course is as heavy on data as it is on theory.  The course moves quickly to touch upon all this material.  Students who do not participate in weekly lectures, or who fall behind on weekly readings, will find it challenging to catch up.  The best way to avoid this difficulty is to keep up to date with the workload.  This means, each week, reading carefully and making meticulous notes.  Students should come to class armed with questions or opinions and be prepared to voice them.

Some students find it helpful to read more extensively on the material covered in the course.  The best reference source for quick facts about medieval topics is the Dictionary of the Middle Ages, which is available in Porter Library’s reference department at D114.D5 1982.  The best online academic site for medieval primary sources is Fordham University’s Medieval Sourcebook.

Each week’s class focuses on a given theme or topic.  The two-hour lecture is followed, later in the week, by a discussion period with exercises.  During this time, students explore a series of questions pertaining to the facts of medieval history and to the study of primary and secondary sources.

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Written assignments:

Students must complete two independent writing assignments as part of their coursework in HIST 260: a documentary analysis and a final essay.  Both assignments must conform to the following parameters:

All written work must be typed using Times New Roman (or something comparable) at a character pitch of 12.  Margins must be 1” on all sides and the assignment must not have a cover page.  Students must use footnotes as opposed to endnotes or parenthetical references.  They should consult the Chicago Manual of Style for further formatting details.

Style counts when writing!  The instructor awards points for smooth prose and deducts them for awkward, or incorrect, use of the English language.  Students at every level are encouraged to make use of the University of Waterloo’s Writing Centre (http://elpp.uwaterloo.ca/writingcentre.html). 

Documentary analysis:

All students in HIST 260 must write a 1 200 word documentary analysis based on one of several pre-selected primary sources provided by the instructor.  The purpose of the assignment is to train students to interpret edited and translated medieval documents.  As part of the assignment, students will submit a bibliography comprising four scholarly secondary sources.

Final essay:

Students in HIST 260 must also write a 1 500 word essay, due at the end of term.  The essay topic(s) will be assigned during the semester.

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Copies of Assignments:

Students are required to keep paper and/or other reliable back-up copies of all out-of-class assignments.  The instructor may require them to resubmit work at any time.

Deadlines:

The instructor imposes a five per cent late penalty for each day after the due date on all assignments.  This includes week-ends and holidays.

Please consult the list of important dates at the bottom of this document for specific assignments’ deadlines.

Academic Integrity:

In order to maintain a culture of academic integrity, members of the University of Waterloo and its Federated University and Affiliated Colleges are expected to promote honesty, trust, fairness, respect and responsibility.  For more information, please consult the Academic Integrity Website for the Faculty of Arts (
http://arts.uwaterloo.ca/arts/ugrad/academic_responsibility.html) and the Academic Integrity Office at the University of Watelroo (http://uwaterloo.ca/academicintegrity/).

Discipline:

All students registered in courses at St. Jerome’s University are expected to know what constitutes academic integrity, to avoid committing academic offences, and to take responsibility for their actions. A student who is unsure whether an action constitutes an offence, or who needs help in learning how to avoid offences (e.g., plagiarism, cheating) or about “rules” for group work/collaboration should seek guidance from the course professor, academic advisor, or the Associate Dean. When misconduct has been found to have occurred, disciplinary penalties will be imposed under St. Jerome’s University Academic Discipline Policy and UW Policy 71 – Student Discipline. For information on categories of offenses and types of penalties, students should refer to Policy 71 - Student Discipline, www.adm.uwaterloo.ca/infosec/Policies/policy71.htm

Grievance:

A student who believes that a decision affecting some aspect of his/her university life has been unfair or unreasonable may have grounds for initiating a grievance. In such a case, contact the St. Jerome’s University Grievance Officer. Read St. Jerome’s University Handbook, Section4, item 8, www.sju.ca/faculty/SJU_handbook/grievance_policy.html.
 
Appeals:

A student may appeal the finding and/or penalty in a decision made under St. Jerome’s University Academic Discipline Policy or Grievance Policy if a ground for an appeal can be established. In such a case, contact the St. Jerome’s University Appeals Officer. Read St. Jerome’s University Handbook, Section 6.4, www.sju.ca/faculty/SJU_handbook/examinations_grades_standings_and_appeals.html.

Special Needs:

Students with documented or suspected disabilities (i.e., physical, learning, or sensory disabilities or chronic medical conditions) are encouraged to contact the Office for Persons with Disabilities (OPD) to determine eligibility for their services. OPD is located in Needles Hall 1132, 888-4567 ext. 5082.

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Illness and Missed Tests:

The University of Waterloo Examination Regulations are available online at
http://www.registrar.uwaterloo.ca/exams/ExamRegs.pdf .

If a student has a test/examination deferred due to acceptable medical evidence, he/she normally will write the test/examination at a mutually convenient time, to be determined by the course instructor.

The regulations stipulate that a medical certificate presented in support of an official petition for relief from normal academic requirements must provide all of the information requested on the “University of Waterloo Verification of Illness” form or it will not be accepted. This form can be obtained from Health Services or at http://www.healthservices.uwaterloo.ca/Health_Services/VERIFICATION%20OF%20ILLNESS.html .

In cases of illness resulting in a missed examination, moreover, students who obtain a University of Waterloo Verification of Illness form from Health Services, in accordance with Examination Regulations from the Registrar’s office, must note:

The instructor only accepts UW Verification of Illness forms that indicate a Severe illness.  Students who obtain Verification of Illness forms that indicate Moderate, Slight, or Negligible illness will under no circumstances be permitted to write a make-up examination and will receive a grade of zero for that examination.

Student travel plans are not acceptable grounds for granting an alternative final examination period.

The University acknowledges that, due to the pluralistic nature of the University community, some students may, on religious grounds, require alternative times to write tests and examinations.

 

Grading Scale
Courses in the Faculty of Arts are graded according to the following scale:

Letter Grade

Numeric Value

Description

 

 

 

A+

90-100

Exceptional

A

85-89

Excellent

A-

80-84

Excellent

B+

77-79

Very good

B

73-76

Good

B-

70-72

Good

C+

67-69

Competent

C

63-66

Fairly Competent

C-

60-62

Fairly Competent

D+

57-59

Passing

D

53-56

Barely passing

D-

50-52

Barely passing

F+

42-49

Marginally failing

F

35-41

Failing

F-

0-34

Failing

According to this system, a grade of C-, C, or C+ indicates that the evaluated work meets the basic requirements of the assignment.  In order to achieve a mark above C+, the assignment must demonstrate superior characteristics such as a sophisticated understanding of the topic, an awareness or ability to use more advanced methodologies, a creative approach, etc.

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Tentative Curriculum (precise readings will be confirmed prior to lectures)

1.             Decline & Fall of the Roman Empire
               
Peters, Edward. Europe and the Middle Ages, Fourth Edition (Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Educaiton, 2004): 59 – 88.

A. H. M. Jones, "Over-Taxation and the Decline of the Roman Empire" Antiquity, vol. 33 no. 129 (1959): 39 - 43.

A. H. M. Jones, "The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire" History (New Series), vol. 40 (1955): 209 – 226.

2.             Franks & Merovingians

Peters, Edward. “Land, People, and Kings in Merovingian Francia” in Europe and the Middle Ages, Fourth Edition (Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Educaiton, 2004): 140 – 159.

Périn, Patrick and Laure-Charlotte Feffer, “The Tomb of Chilperic, Father of Clovis,” in Readings in Medieval History, ed. Patrick Geary (Peterborough, Ontario: Broadview Press) 113 – 121.

Online: Tierney 11: Gregory of Tours (539-594): “On Clovis and the Vase at Soissons,” from History of the Franks, Book II.

The Conversion of Clovis: Two Accounts, 496 by The Chronicle of St. Denis, and Gregory of Tours.

Tierney 14, Geary 9, Law of the Salian Franks

[optional reading:] Kurth, Godefroi. “The Franks,” New Catholic Encyclopaedia Online http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/06238a.htm (4 September 2006).

3.             Carolingians: Empire & Renaissance

Edward Peters, Europe and the Middle Ages, Fourth Edition (Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Educaiton, 2004): 160 – 182.

Online: Einhard, “The Life of Charlemagne,” Medieval Sourcebook, Fordham University, http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/basis/einhard.html (14 September 2006)

[Optional:] Kurth, Godefroi. “The Franks,” New Catholic Encyclopaedia Online http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/06238a.htm (4 September 2006).

4.             Feudalism

Edward Peters, Europe and the Middle Ages, Fourth Edition (Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Educaiton, 2004): 220 – 222.

Marc Bloch, Feudal Society, trans. L. A. Manyon (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1965): 211 – 254.

Elizabeth A. R. Brown, “The Tyranny of a Construct: Feudalism and Historians of Medieval Europe.” American Historical Review 79 (1974) : 1063 - 1088.

 

  1. Monasticism: TBA

 

  1. Investiture Controversy

Peters, Edward. Europe and the Middle Ages, Fourth Edition (Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Educaiton, 2004): 242 – 245; 275; 277; 283; 300.

Online: The Conflict over Investitures: Lay Investitures Forbidden; Letter to Gregory VII; Deposition of Henry IV; Second Banning of Henry IV; Solutions:

  1. Twelfth-Century Renaissance

 

Peters, Edward. Europe and the Middle Ages, Fourth Edition (Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Educaiton, 2004): 258 – 276; 327 – 342.

Jacques Le Goff, "What did the Twelfth-Century Renaissance Mean?" in The Medieval World, ed. Peter Linehan and Janet L. Nelson (London: Routledge, 2001): 635 - 647

Olaf Pedersen, The First Universities: Studium Generale and the Origins of University Education in Europe, Richard North, trans. (Cambridge: Cambridge U P, 1997): 122 - 188

  1. Crusades

 

Peters, Edward. Europe and the Middle Ages, Fourth Edition (Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Educaiton, 2004): 248 – 257; 288 – 290; 295 – 6; 319 – 322; 373 – 5.

Christopher Tyerman, "What the Crusades Meant to Europe" in The Medieval World, ed. Peter Linehan and Janet L. Nelson (London: Routledge, 2001): 131 – 145

Online: via the Internet Medieval Sourcebook (http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/sbook.html):

Urban II: Speech at Clermont: Five Versions

Peter the Hermit and the Popular Crusade

Children's Crusade, 1212

9.             Cities & Trade (1000 – 1200)

Peters, Edward. Europe and the Middle Ages, Fourth Edition (Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Educaiton, 2004) 199 - 216.

Online via the Internet Medieval Sourcebook (http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/sbook.html):
The Law of the Fullers & Weavers of Winchester, 1209

10.          Growth of Kingdoms: TBA

11.          Church, Papacy, and Society: TBA

12.          Europe on the Eve of Crisis

Peters, Edward. Europe and the Middle Ages, Fourth Edition (Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Educaiton, 2004) 355 – 372.

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HIST / SMF 317:History of Sexuality: Premodern
Tuesday lecture 9:30 to 11:20; Thursday meetings 10:30 to 11:20
STJ 2011C

Course Description

Course Materials

Grade Breakdown

Expectations and Goals

Written Assignments

Academic Honesty

Grading Scale

Deadlines
Illness and Missed Tests
Special Needs


Dr. Steven Bednarski, Instructor

Office:                    SJU 3010C
Office Hour:          T 4:30 – 5:20*
E-mail *:                 stevenb@ uwaterloo.ca
Telephone:           (519) 884-8110 x 28276

* Or by appointment.

Please note that the instructor replies to e-mail within 48 hrs., Monday through Friday.  E-mail is, therefore, a convenient way to communicate during the week but it should not be relied upon in an emergency or when deadlines are pressing. Please be certain to include first and last name, student number, and course code in the subject line of all e-mail correspondence.

Course Description:

This course introduces students to the history of Western sexuality, beginning with the ancient world and focussing primarily on the Middle Ages and Renaissance.  The course is heavily on methodology.  It considers our state of knowledge about premodern sexuality via the extant historiography.  It explores the benefits offered by interdisciplinary methods.  It presents students with lectures and readings on the theoretical approaches used to interpret gender and sexuality.  Although this course gives students foundational knowledge about historical sexuality it aims primarily to raise questions in the student’s mind about how and why historians construct past realities.

 

Grade Breakdown:

Participation                                        10 %
Midterm Quiz                                       20 %                      
Group Seminars (2)                              20 %
Final Essay                                         25 %
Final Exam                                          25 %


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Important Course Dates:

1 Oct.             Last day to drop with no penalty
20 Oct.             Last day for 50% tuition refund
26 Nov.             Mid-term quiz
3 Dec.             Final essay due

  

Expectations:

  1. Engagement

 

This course is based on the notion of a community of scholars. By that, it is meant that learning occurs through the process of students exploring ideas and debating questions. Consequently, students have a mutual responsibility to each other to prepare in advance, support each other in the group assignments, attend all meetings, and to share their ideas, knowledge, and questions.

The basic requirement for engagement is attendance and, in HIST 317, attendance is mandatory.  The instructor takes attendance each class.  Students who do not attend 80% of the classes have not adequately participated in the course and will be denied the credit.

  1. Global Participation

 

Students, moreover, must fulfill all the course requirements in order to receive credit for HIST 317.  This not only includes weekly attendance but also all written and oral assignments, tests, quizzes, and examinations.

  1. Historical Knowledge

 

History 317 is not a survey course.  It presupposes a basic familiarity with the major names, dates, and events of the European Middle Ages.  While there is no prerequisite for the course, students may find it advantageous to take first HIST 260 or HIST 304.  Students who have not previously studied the details of medieval history may find it useful to “brush up” independently on their medieval history.  There are several tools available to help students familiarize themselves with the Middle Ages.  The best reference source for quick facts about medieval topics is the Dictionary of the Middle Ages, which is available in the reference department at both the St. Jerome and Porter Libraries.  The best online academic site for medieval primary sources is Fordham University’s Medieval Sourcebook. The standard textbook used in survey courses on the Middle Ages is Edward Peters’ Europe and the Middle Ages.

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Assignments:

  1. Group Seminar

 

Each week, at least one group of about three students must present a seminar on one of the assigned readings.    The instructor normally awards a group mark and assumes that all members of the group will participate equally in the preparation and delivery of the seminar.

The instructor grades seminars on the following criteria:

  1. Organization (Did the group have a clear outline or plan?  Was there a handout?  Was the class able to follow along?)

  2. Presentation Skills (Did the speakers speak clearly?  Did they use any visual aids?  Were they of good quality?)

  3. Content (How accurately and clearly did the speakers summarize their material?)

 

Students who are not presenting must come prepared to engage those delivering the seminar.  The instructor awards participation points to those who are active participants in seminars.

  1.  Critical Essay

 

Students must complete an essay as part of their coursework in HIST 317.  The instructor will assign the essay topic during the term. 

Essays must conform to the following parameters:

Essays must be between 500 and 1500 words long.

All written work must be typed using Times New Roman (or something comparable) at a character pitch of 12.  Margins must be 1” on all sides and the assignment must not have a cover page.  Students must use footnotes as opposed to endnotes or parenthetical references.  They should consult the Chicago Manual of Style for further formatting details.

Style counts when writing!  The instructor awards points for smooth prose and deducts them for awkward, or incorrect, use of the English language.  Students at every level are encouraged to make use of the University of Waterloo’s Writing Centre
(http://elpp.uwaterloo.ca/writingcentre.html). 

Please take note: students are required to keep paper and/or other reliable back-up copies of all out-of-class assignments.  The instructor may require them to resubmit work at any time.

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Academic Integrity:

In order to maintain a culture of academic integrity, members of the University of Waterloo and its Federated University and Affiliated Colleges are expected to promote honesty, trust, fairness, respect and responsibility.  For more information, please consult the Academic Integrity Website for the Faculty of Arts (
http://arts.uwaterloo.ca/arts/ugrad/academic_responsibility.html) and the Academic Integrity Office at the University of Watelroo (http://uwaterloo.ca/academicintegrity/).

Discipline:

All students registered in courses at St. Jerome’s University are expected to know what constitutes academic integrity, to avoid committing academic offences, and to take responsibility for their actions. A student who is unsure whether an action constitutes an offence, or who needs help in learning how to avoid offences (e.g., plagiarism, cheating) or about “rules” for group work/collaboration should seek guidance from the course professor, academic advisor, or the Associate Dean. When misconduct has been found to have occurred, disciplinary penalties will be imposed under St. Jerome’s University Academic Discipline Policy and UW Policy 71 – Student Discipline. For information on categories of offenses and types of penalties, students should refer to Policy 71 - Student Discipline, www.adm.uwaterloo.ca/infosec/Policies/policy71.htm

Grievance:

A student who believes that a decision affecting some aspect of his/her university life has been unfair or unreasonable may have grounds for initiating a grievance. In such a case, contact the St. Jerome’s University Grievance Officer. Read St. Jerome’s University Handbook, Section4, item 8, www.sju.ca/faculty/SJU_handbook/grievance_policy.html.
 
Appeals:

A student may appeal the finding and/or penalty in a decision made under St. Jerome’s University Academic Discipline Policy or Grievance Policy if a ground for an appeal can be established. In such a case, contact the St. Jerome’s University Appeals Officer. Read St. Jerome’s University Handbook, Section 6.4, www.sju.ca/faculty/SJU_handbook/examinations_grades_standings_and_appeals.html.

Deadlines:

The instructor imposes a five per cent late penalty for each day after the due date on all assignments.  This includes week-ends and holidays.

Please consult the list of important dates for specific assignments’ deadlines.

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Special Needs:

Students with documented or suspected disabilities (i.e., physical, learning, or sensory disabilities or chronic medical conditions) are encouraged to contact the Office for Persons with Disabilities (OPD) to determine eligibility for their services. OPD is located in Needles Hall 1132, 888-4567 ext. 5082.


Illness and Missed Tests:

The University of Waterloo Examination Regulations are available online at
http://www.registrar.uwaterloo.ca/exams/ExamRegs.pdf .

If a student has a test/examination deferred due to acceptable medical evidence, he/she normally will write the test/examination at a mutually convenient time, to be determined by the course instructor.

The regulations stipulate that a medical certificate presented in support of an official petition for relief from normal academic requirements must provide all of the information requested on the “University of Waterloo Verification of Illness” form or it will not be accepted. This form can be obtained from Health Services or at http://www.healthservices.uwaterloo.ca/Health_Services/VERIFICATION%20OF%20ILLNESS.html .

In cases of illness resulting in a missed examination, moreover, students who obtain a University of Waterloo Verification of Illness form from Health Services, in accordance with Examination Regulations from the Registrar’s office, must note:

The instructor only accepts UW Verification of Illness forms that indicate a Severe illness.  Students who obtain Verification of Illness forms that indicate Moderate, Slight, or Negligible illness will under no circumstances be permitted to write a make-up examination and will receive a grade of zero for that examination.

Student travel plans are not acceptable grounds for granting an alternative final examination period.

The University acknowledges that, due to the pluralistic nature of the University community, some students may, on religious grounds, require alternative times to write tests and examinations.

click here to return to the top

Grading Scale:
Courses in the Faculty of Arts are graded according to the following scale:

Letter Grade

Numeric Value

Description

 

 

 

A+

90-100

Exceptional

A

85-89

Excellent

A-

80-84

Excellent

B+

77-79

Very good

B

73-76

Good

B-

70-72

Good

C+

67-69

Competent

C

63-66

Fairly Competent

C-

60-62

Fairly Competent

D+

57-59

Passing

D

53-56

Barely passing

D-

50-52

Barely passing

F+

42-49

Marginally failing

F

35-41

Failing

F-

0-34

Failing

According to this system, a grade of C-, C, or C+ indicates that the evaluated work meets the basic requirements of the assignment.  In order to achieve a mark above C+, the assignment must demonstrate superior characteristics such as a sophisticated understanding of the topic, an awareness or ability to use more advanced methodologies, a creative approach, etc.

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Required Text:

Vern L. Bullough and James A. Brundage, Sexual Practices and the Medieval Church (Buffalo, NY: Prometheus Books, 1981).

This text will be available for purchase through the UW Bookstore.  Other required readings are available online or are on reserve in the SJU library.

Tentative Curriculum and Reading List
(NB: the instructor will confirm readings one week prior to each meeting)

Week 1: Introduction: The Study of Sex and Sexuality in the Distant Past

Ruth Mazo Karras, “Sexuality in the Middle Ages,” in The Medieval World, ed. P. Linehan and J.L. Nelson (New York: Routledge, 2001), 279-93.

Week 2: Concepts and Methods

Robert Padgug, "Sexual Matters: Rethinking Sexuality in History," in Hidden From History. Reclaiming the Gay and Lesbian Past, ed. M. Duberman, M. Vicinus, and G. Chauncey (New York: Penguin, 1981), 54-64.

John Boswell, "Towards the Long View: Revolutions, Universals and Sexual Categories,"in Hidden From History. Reclaiming the Gay and Lesbian Past, ed. M. Duberman, M. Vicinus, and G. Chauncey (New York: Penguin, 1981), 17-36.

Jacqueline Murray, “Historicizing Sex, Sexualizing History,” in Writing Medieval History, ed. Nancy Partner (London: Hodder, 2005), 133-52.

Week 3: The Classical Inheritance

David M. Halperin, "Sex Before Sexuality: Pederasty, Politics, and Power in Classical Athens," in Hidden From History. Reclaiming the Gay and Lesbian Past, ed. M. Duberman, M. Vicinus, and G. Chauncey (New York: Penguin, 1981), 37-53.

Week 4: The Christian Inheritance
                Bullough and Brundage, chapters 1 & 2

James A. Brundage, “ ‘Allas That Evere Love Was Synne’: Sex and Medieval Canon Law,” in Brundage, Sex, Law and Marriage in the Middle Ages, Essay 2.

Joyce E. Salisbury, "The Latin doctors of the Church on Sexuality," Journal of Medieval History 12 (1986): 279-89.

Week 5: Science, Medicine, and Physiology

Bullough, Brundage, chapter 17

Jacqueline Murray "Sexuality and Spirituality: the Intersection of Medieval Theology and Medicine," Fides et Historia 23:1 (1991): 20-36.

Joan Cadden, "Medieval Scientific and Medical Views of Sexuality: Questions of Propriety," Medievalia et Humanistica NS 14 (1986): 157-71.

                Helen R. Lemay, "William of Saliceto on Human Sexuality," Viator 12 (1981): 165-81.

Week 6: Celibacy & Chastity
Bullough & Brundage, chapters 3 and 9

Clarissa Atkinson, "'Precious Balsam in a Fragile Glass': The Ideology of Virginity in the Later Middle Ages," Journal of Family History 8 (1983):131-43.

Aaron W. Godfrey, "Rules and Regulation: Monasticism and Chastity," in Homo Carnalis: The Carnal Aspect of Medieval Humans Life, ed. H. R. Lemay, 45-57.

André Vauchez, “Conjugal Chastity: A New Ideal in the Thirteenth Century,” in The Laity in the Middle Ages. Religious Beliefs and Devotional Practices (Notre Dame, 1993), 185-90.

                Vitae of Injuriousus, Etheldreda, and Edward the Confessor
Week 7: Martial Sexuality
                Bullough & Brundage, ch 10, 11

Elizabeth Makowski, "The Conjugal Debt in Medieval Canon Law," Journal of Medieval History 3 (1977): 99-114.

Jean-Louis Flandrin, “Sex in Married Life in the Early Middle Ages,” in Western Sexuality, ed. Aries and Béjin, Chapter 10.

Michael M. Sheehan, “Maritalis Affectio Revisited,” in Marriage, Family, and the Law in Medieval Europe. Collected Essays, ed. James Farge (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1996), 262-77.

Dyan Elliott, “Bernardino of Siena and the Marriage Debt” in Desire and Discipline. Sex and Sexuality in the Premodern West, ed. J. Murray and K. Eisenbichler (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1996), 168-200.

Week 8: Male Sexuality and Masculinities
                Bullough & Brundage, ch. 12

Jacqueline Murray, "On the Origins and Role of 'Wise Women' in Causes for Annulment on the Grounds of Male Impotence," Journal of Medieval History 16 (1990): 235-49.
                                                                                                                                                                                                         
Vern L. Bullough, “On Being a Male in the Middle Ages,” in Medieval Masculinities, ed. C. Lees, 31-45.

Jacqueline Murray, “‘The law of sin that is in my members’: The Problem of Male Embodiment,” in Gender and Holiness, ed. Riches and Salih (London: Routledge, 2002),  9-22.

Bednarski, Steven and Andree Courtmanche, “Learning to be a Man: Public Schooling and Apprenticeship in Late Medieval Manosque.” Journal of Medieval History, Vol. 35, no. 2 (June 2009): 113 - 135.


Week 9: Female Sexuality and Feminities
Helen R. Lemay, "Some Thirteenth and Fourteenth Century Lectures on Female Sexuality," International Journal of Women's Studies 1 (1978):391-400.
                               
Charles T. Wood, "The Doctors' Dilemma: Sin, Salvation, and the Menstrual Cycle in Medieval Thought," Speculum 56 (1981):710-27.

                Peter Biller, "Childbirth in the Middle Ages," History Today 36 (Aug. 1986): 42-49.

Ruth Mazo Karras, “Sex and the Singlewoman,” in Singlewomen in the European Past, ed. J. Bennett and A. Froide (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1999), 127-45.

Week 10: “Homosexuality”
Louis Crompton, "The Myth of Lesbian Impunity: Capital Laws from 1270-1791," Journal of Homosexuality 6 (1980-81): 11-25.
                               
Jacqueline Murray, “Twice Marginal and Twice Invisible: Lesbians in the Middle Ages,” in Handbook of Medieval Sexuality, V.L. Bullough and J. Brundage (New York: Garland, 1996), 191-222.

Helmut Puff, “Female Sodomy: The Trial of Katherina Hetzeldorfer (1477),” Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies 30:1 (2000): 41-61

John Boswell, Same Sex Unions in Premodern Europe (New York: Villard Books, 1994): TBA.

Week 11: Transvestism
                Bullough & Brundage, ch. 5

                John Anson, "The Female Transvestite in Early Monasticism," Viator 5 (1974): 1-32.

                Vern L. Bullough and Bonnie Bullough, Cross Dressing, Sex and Gender, Ch. 3.

Valerie Hotchkiss, “Disguise and Despair: The Life of Hildegund von Schönau,” Woman’s Protagonists and Poets in the German Middle Ages,  29-41.

Ruth Mazo Karras and David Lorenzo Boyd, “Ut Cum Mulier: A Male Transvestite Prostitute in Fourteenth-Century London, in Premodern Sexualities, ed. L. Fradenburg and C. Freccero (New York: Routledge, 1996),101-16.

Vern L. Bullough, "Transvestites in the Middle Ages" American Journal of Sociology79 (6): 1381 – 1394.
(available for download via JSTOR)

Barbara Sher Tinsley, "Pope Joan Polemic in Early Modern France: The Use and Disabuse of Myth," Sixteenth Century Journal Vol. 18, No. 3 (1987): 381 - 397

Week 12: Conclusion

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HIST 304 / RS 342: Heresy and Religious Crises in the Later Middle Ages
Lecture: Tuesdas from 9:30 to 11:20
Tutorial: Thursday from 10:30 to 11:20

Location: STJ 2011

Course Description

Grade Breakdown

Expectations and Goals

Assignments

Academic Integrity

Grading Scale

Deadlines
Illness and Missed Tests
Special Needs

Course Materials

Tentative Syllabus

Course Description: 

The 800 years span between the fifth-century fall of the Roman Empire and the end of the thirteenth century saw the elaboration and dissemination of new, dominant, modes of governance, religious belief, and cosmology.  Within the first two decades of the fourteenth century, however, everything changed.  The Great Famine, the Black Death, the Hundred Years War, and the Great Schism all contributed to a sudden, urgent, and pervasive state of social crisis which lasted throughout the fourteenth century.  These traumas struck medievals, many of whom distrusted change and innovation, violently.  Problems which had been buried or suppressed for many years bubbled to the surface even as new challenges to traditional ways arose.  Many of these took the form of rebellions against previous beliefs or assumptions.  Heresies, in particular, abounded and Europeans began to re-interrogate old assumption and to seek answers new questions.  The net result was a weakening of European hegemony and the birth of a more complex, and, ultimately, more modern Europe.  Students in HIST 304 will use so-called heresies and religious crises to trace this evolution.  In addition, students will engage relevant methodological questions, contemplate the relationship between heresy, orthodoxy, and authority, and evaluate notions of alterity.

Grade Breakdown: 

Lecture Participation 5%
Tutorial Grade 10%
Midterm Exam 20%
Analytical Essay 15%
Final Essay 25%
Final Exam 25%

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Expectations and Goals:

The basic requirement for participation is attendance and, in HIST 304, attendance is mandatory. The instructor and tutorial leader take attendance each class. Students who do not attend 80% of the classes have not adequately participated in the course and may, consequently, be denied the credit.

Students, moreover, must fulfill all the course requirements in order to receive credit for HIST 304. This not only includes attendance at lectures and tutorials but also all written assignments and examinations.

History 304 is not a survey course. It presupposes a basic familiarity with the major names, dates, and events of the European Middle Ages. While there is no prerequisite for the course, students may find it advantageous to first take HIST 260, or to take that course concurrently with HIST 304. Students who have not previously studied the details of medieval history may find it useful to “brush up” independently on their medieval history.

There are several tools available to help students familiarize themselves with the Middle Ages. The best reference source for quick facts about medieval topics is the Dictionary of the Middle Ages, which is available in the reference department at both the St. Jerome and Porter Libraries. The best online aca-demic site for medieval primary sources is Fordham University’s Medieval Sourcebook. The standard textbook used in survey courses on the Middle Ages is Edward Peters’ Europe and the Middle Ages.

Each week’s classes focus on a given theme or topic. The weekly two-hour lecture is supported by a discussion period with required exercises. During this time, students will explore a series of questions pertaining to the facts of medieval history and to the study of primary and secondary sources.

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Written assignments:

Students must complete two written assignments as part of their coursework in HIST 304: a shorter analytical essay and a longer final essay.  Both assignments must conform to the following parameters:

All written work must be typed using Times New Roman (or something comparable) at a character pitch of 12.  Margins must be 1” on all sides and the assignment must not have a cover page.  Students must use footnotes as opposed to endnotes or parenthetical references.  They should consult the Chicago Manual of Style for further formatting details.

Style counts when writing!  The instructor awards points for smooth prose and deducts them for awkward, or incorrect, use of the English language.  Students at every level are encouraged to make use of the University of Waterloo’s Writing Centre (http://elpp.uwaterloo.ca/writingcentre.html).

 

Students are required to keep paper and / or other reliable back-up copies of all out-of-class assignments. The instructor may require students to resubmit work at any time.

 

The instructor will distribute specific instructions for both of the written assignments in class.

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Academic Integrity:

 

In order to maintain a culture of academic integrity, members of the University of Waterloo and its Federated University and Affiliated Colleges are expected to promote honesty, trust, fairness, respect and responsibility.

 

Discipline: All students registered in courses at St. Jerome’s University are expected to know what constitutes academic integrity, to avoid committing academic offences, and to take responsibility for their actions. A student who is unsure whether an action constitutes an offence, or who needs help in learning how to avoid offences (e.g., plagiarism, cheating) or about “rules” for group work/collaboration should seek guidance from the course professor, academic advisor, or the Associate Dean. When misconduct has been found to have occurred, disciplinary penalties will be imposed following St. Jerome’s University Academic Discipline Procedure and UW Policy 71 – Student Discipline. For information on categories of offenses and types of penalties, students should refer to Policy 71 Student Discipline, www.adm.uwaterloo.ca/infosec/Policies/policy71.htm.

 

Grievance: A student who believes that a decision affecting some aspect of his/her university life has been unfair or unreasonable may have grounds for initiating a grievance. In such a case, contact the St. Jerome’s University Grievance Officer. Read St. Jerome’s University Handbook, Section 4, item 8, www.sju.ca/faculty/SJU_handbook/grievance_policy.html.

 

Appeals: A student may appeal the finding and/or penalty in a decision made under St. Jerome’s University Academic Discipline Procedure or Grievance Policy if a ground for an appeal can be established. In such a case, contact the St. Jerome’s University Appeals Officer. Read St. Jerome’s University Handbook, Section 6.4 www.sju.ca/faculty/SJU_handbook/examinations_grades_standings_and_appeals.html.

 

Academic Integrity website (Arts):

http://arts.uwaterloo.ca/arts/ugrad/academic_responsibility.html

 

Academic Integrity Office (UW): http://uwaterloo.ca/academicintegrity/

 

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Grading Scale
Courses in the Faculty of Arts are graded according to the following scale:

Letter Grade

Numeric Value

Description

 

 

 

A+

90-100

Exceptional

A

85-89

Excellent

A-

80-84

Excellent

B+

77-79

Very good

B

73-76

Good

B-

70-72

Good

C+

67-69

Competent

C

63-66

Fairly Competent

C-

60-62

Fairly Competent

D+

57-59

Passing

D

53-56

Barely passing

D-

50-52

Barely passing

F+

42-49

Marginally failing

F

35-41

Failing

F-

0-34

Failing

According to this system, a grade of C-, C, or C+ indicates that the evaluated work meets the basic requirements of the assignment.  In order to achieve a mark above C+, the assignment must demonstrate superior characteristics such as a sophisticated understanding of the topic, an awareness or ability to use more advanced methodologies, a creative approach, etc.

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Deadlines:

The instructor imposes a five per cent late penalty for each day after the due date on all assignments.  This includes week-ends and holidays.

16 Oct. Analytical essay due
27 Oct. Mid-term exam
6 Nov. Last day to drop with a WD grade
4 Dec. Final essay due

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Illness and Missed Tests:

 

The University of Waterloo Examination Regulations are available online at http://www.registrar.uwaterloo.ca/exams/ExamRegs.pdf .

 

If a student has a test/examination deferred due to acceptable medical evidence, he/she normally will write the test/examination at a mutually convenient time, to be determined by the course instructor.

 

The regulations stipulate that a medical certificate presented in support of an official petition for relief from normal academic requirements must provide all of the information requested on the “University of Waterloo Verification of Illness” form or it will not be accepted. This form can be obtained from Health Services or at http://www.healthservices.uwaterloo.ca/Health_Services/VERIFICATION%20OF%20ILLNESS.html .

 

In cases of illness resulting in a missed examination, moreover, students who obtain a University of Waterloo Verification of Illness form from Health Services, in accordance with Examination Regulations from the Registrar’s office, must note:

 

The instructor only accepts UW Verification of Illness forms that indicate a Severe illness.  Students who obtain Verification of Illness forms that indicate Moderate, Slight, or Negligible illness will under no circumstances be permitted to write a make-up examination and will receive a grade of zero for that examination.

Barring an infection of H1N1, the instructor only accepts UW Verification of Illness forms that indicate a Severe illness. Students who obtain Verification of Illness forms that indicate Moderate, Slight, or Negligible illness will under no circumstances be permitted to write a make-up examination and will receive a grade of zero for that examination.

Student travel plans are not acceptable grounds for granting an alternative final examination period.

The University acknowledges that, due to the pluralistic nature of the University community, some students may, on religious grounds, require alternative times to write tests and examinations.

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Special Needs:

 

The Office for Persons with Disabilities (OPD), located in Needles Hall, Room 1132, collaborates with all academic departments to arrange appropriate accommodations for students with disabilities without compromising the academic integrity of the curriculum. If you require academic accommodations to lessen the impact of your disability, please register with the OPD at the beginning of each academic term.

 

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Course Materials:

 

All students in HIST 304 are required to purchase the following item:

HIST 304 / RS 325 Course Package

This bound set of legally photocopied readings is available at the UW bookstore.  The price is dictated in large part by the constraints imposed by the Canada Copyright Act.

In addition to the course kit, the instructor will provide links to online primary sources throughout the term.

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Tentative Curriculum (a detailed readings list will be distributed in print at the first class)

  1. First Class: Studying Heresy

  2. Early Heresies

  3. High Medieval Heresies and the Formation of the Inquisition Against Heresies

  4. The Cathars, the Albigensian Crusade, and Montaillou

  5. The Trial of the Knights Templar

  6. The Avignon Papacy & the Great Schism

  7. Elite Magic

  8. Hundred Years War

  9. The Trial of Joan of Arc

  10. English Peasants’ Revolt

  11. The Black Death and Religious Crisis

  12. Last Class: Conclusions
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HIST 402 A & B: Medieval Europe aka Law, Love, and Lies: Approaches to Late Medieval Social History
HIST 402A:Tuesdays 2:30 - 4:20 in STJ 2011
HIST 402B: Tuesdays 12:30 - 2:20 in STJ 3013

 

Course Description

Course Materials

Grade Breakdown

Expectations and Goals

Assignments

Academic Honesty

Grading Scale

Deadlines
Illness and Missed Tests
Special Needs
 
** Course Files **

Course Description

This course examines different forms of social and cultural power at play in Europe during the later Middle Ages and asks how historians relate to them.

Medieval courts penetrated, and attempted to regulate, all realms of human existence whether expressly public or intimately private. Privately, they were implicated in struggles involving family, adultery, sex, wife assault, love, and marriage, to name but a few. They, however, also sought to regulate religious practices, the human body, human identity, material possessions, and inter-governmental conflicts. Yet courts were not autonomous beings. Rather, they were controlled, directed, and exploited by different social agents, each with their own unique set of priorities and strategies. As these agents pursued their ends, the chords of power clashed and resonated. Their echoes resound still today.

Students in HIST 402 read a range of primary sources in English translation to help them explore notions of social and cultural power struggles. In order to compliment the evidence gathered by studying courtly activity, they will also consult some non-legal primary documents.

Finally, students in HIST 402 look at how historians interpret the past. As they read about historians’ representations of past social struggles, students will consider the lenses through which we view past people and events. Biases, approaches, methodologies, and ideologies all colour our sense of the distant past. Students will, therefore, become better aware of scholarly schools of thought and different ways of interpreting evidence.

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Course Materials

Each week, the instructor will provide a list of readings for the following class based on a certain theme.  Most of the weekly thematic readings are available on reserve at the St. Jerome’s library.  In addition, there are two books which must be purchased from the University of Waterloo bookstore.  These are:

Gene Brucker, Giovanni & Lusanna: Love and Marriage in Renaissance Florence (Berkeley: U of California P, 1988).

Natalie Zemon-Davis, The Return of Martin Guerre (Cambridge: Harvard U P, 1983).

Finally, students must also purchase a third book which is unavailable at the University of Waterloo bookstore:

Emanuel Le Roy Ladurie, Montaillou: The Promised Land of Error, trans. Barbara Bray (New York: George Braziller, 1978.

In 2006, the copyright on this third book reverted to the author and the publisher, therefore, lost the rights to print it.  Luckily, the book is still widely available in used and new bookstores.  Students should consult www.abebooks.com , www.alibris.com , and www.amazon.com to obtain a reasonably priced edition.
 

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Grade Breakdown

HIST 402A     HIST 402B  
         
Reading log 1 15 %   Comprehensive bibliography 10 %
Reading log 2 15 %   Seminar 20 %
Historiographical essay 40 %   Research essay 40 %
Class participation 30 %   Class participation 30 %

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Expectations and Goals

History 402 is a fourth-year undergraduate seminar. It assumes a good knowledge of the basic events, names, and dates of the European Middle Ages (c.500 – 1500 AD). It is not, therefore, equipped to teach such information and students are fully expected to “brush up” independently on their medieval history, if need be.

The best reference source for quick facts about medieval topics is the Dictionary of the Middle Ages, which is available in Porter Library’s reference department at D114.D5 1982. The best online academic site for medieval primary sources is Fordham University’s Medieval Sourcebook. The standard textbook used in survey courses on the Middle Ages is Edward Peters’ Europe and the Middle Ages.

The good news:

Fourth-year seminars do not comprise a regular lecture schedule, nor do they culminate in a final examination!

The bad news:

The seminar group meets weekly to discuss a given theme. The course director assigns readings and it is expected that everyone who attends the class will have mastered them. Mastery of academic literature requires not only delicate reading but also careful note-taking. Since a good seminar depends upon a lively discussion, students are expected to appear in class armed with ideas, questions, and notes based on the readings. They must be prepared to voice opinions and to challenge instructor and peer alike! Students who attend class ill-prepared, or who miss class, will suffer a reduction in their participation grade. They may also become intimately familiar with the intricacies of medieval torture.

Students must select a research topic which they will explore throughout the term. Students who take HIST 402B after completing HIST 402A will continue to research the same topic. The course director must approve all topics. Topics must draw from any area of society, so long as it demonstrates a mature understanding of social or cultural power. Students should consult and exploit the course director’s vast expertise and wisdom, especially in the early stages of their research.

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Assignments

Students in HIST 402A complete two sets of reading logs and one historiographical essay.  Students in HIST 402B must compile one comprehensive bibliography and write one research essay.  Students in 402B must also complete a non-written assignment in the form of a one-hour seminar on their selected research topic.

All written assignments must be submitted double-spaced, using the Times New Roman font at a character pitch of 12.  Margins must be 1” on all sides.  Footnotes should be used instead of endnotes.  If in doubt about format for references, please consult the Chicago Manual of Style.

Style counts when writing.  The course director awards points for smooth prose and deducts them for awkward or incorrect use of the English language.

Here is detailed information on each of writing assignments:

• Weekly Reading Logs:

Each week, in addition to the assigned readings, students are expected to read items pertaining to their research topics.  This reading can comprise an additional chapter or more of a book, one or more journal articles, annotated bibliographies, etc.  If students wish to use the same book for more than one reading log, they must obtain the instructor’s consent.

Students are required to keep a journal or log as they read to indicate the nature of what they have read and their thoughts on it.  This log will develop into a “stream of research” and will serve as the basis for subsequent assignments.  It should reflect an awareness of how the independent readings relate to one another.  It should also contain critical remarks on what students thought of their authors’ material and how it might be exploited within the framework of their own developing research.  Other points to address in keeping reading logs are:

  1. The place of writing / of the author, his or her nationality, and institutional affiliation.
  2. The nature of the research: is it archival, synthetic, or conceptual?
  3. Peer review: was it reviewed by other scholars?
  4. Does the writer belong to an intellectual school?  Has he or she a mentor?
  5. Was the scholarship financed?
  6. Is the author a senior or junior scholar?
  7. Does the piece fit into a specific, prominent, and ongoing debate?
  8. Is the piece revolutionary in character or does it add to an existing understanding and approach?
  9. The degree of impact it made on the reader.

Moreover: 

  1. The reading log should indicate any additional references which were extracted from the piece (other books, articles, etc.).

Weekly reading logs should be compact, synthetic, intellectual commentaries.  Students may write informally, but should observe the standards of an academic researcher (i.e. clear references, proper grammar, spelling, etc.).  Each submission should be about 300 typed words and they should be collected in a duo-tang folder.

Click here to download a sample reading log (the Adobe Acrobat Reader is required to view the file).

Or, click the Get Adobe Reader icon if you first need to download and install the program:

• Historiographical Essay:

At the end of HIST 402A, students must write an historiographical essay that surveys the major works related to their topic.  This essay should begin by presenting the context of their study including:

a.)     The definition and justification for the spatial parameters of the topic

b.)     The definition and justification for the temporal parameters of the topic

c.)     The definition and justification for the methodological parameters of the topic

d.)     A detailed survey of the major authors and their words pertaining to this topic

 The historiographical essays must be no longer than 3,000 words (about ten pages, excluding bibliography).  Please see the Writing Format section below for other specifications.

• Comprehensive Bibliography:

For students in HIST 402B, the previous term’s reading logs and historiographical essay, along with their independent research, serve as the basis for accumulating a specialized bibliography on the selected topic.  The bibliography must contain no less than 30 distinct scholarly references.  Please note that this is not an annotated bibliography.

• Research Seminar

Students in HIST 402B must present a forty-five minute seminar on their selected research topic.  Seminars are presented at the end of term, prior to submitting the final research essay, and are intended to allow students to voice their arguments, theories, and discoveries.  Students may fill the forty-five minutes however they like, but a portion of the seminar should be interactive.  To that end, students must assign readings to the class on their topic.  These readings must be assigned by no later than the week prior to their presentation.  Presentations should also make use of some form of visual aide and should include a hand-out.  Dynamic and thought-provoking presentations will be rewarded with better grades than dull and dreary ones!

• Research Essay:

Essays represent the culmination of a university education.  In HIST 402B, they also represent the culmination of a term’s worth of guided research.  They should reveal the extent to which students have mastered the art of structuring an argument.  Since this is an honours History course, essays must also demonstrate an understanding of solid historical methodology and approach.  Students must submit essays by the established deadline.  The course director deducts marks for lateness (see below). 

Essays must be approximately 4,500 words (15 typed pages, excluding bibliography).

• Participation

The instructor awards up to three participation points per class.  Students automatically earn one point for attending the entire class.  They may earn a second point for speaking up in class, and, potentially, a third for making a comment that reveals genuine insight.  At the end of the term, the instructor adds up all the points and derives a percentage that is then used for the student’s participation score.

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Academic Honesty

All students should read, and be familiar with the University of Waterloo’s Policy 71 (Student Academic Discipline Policy. The History Department at St. Jerome’s will take all appropriate measures to deal with students who commit academic offences. Recent penalties have included failure in the course, suspen-sion from the University, and withholding or rescinding of degrees from the Univesity of Wateloo. Except in cases where the instructor specifies otherwise, cheating during in-class or take-home examinations, collaborating on written assignments, failing to use quotation marks and citations when using or para-phrasing the printed or electronically-transmitted work of others, submitting work purchased from, or writ-ten by, someone else, reproducing work submitted in another course, aiding or abetting academic mis-conduct, and violating any other part of the Policy on Academic Honesty will result in penalties. For fur-ther information, see:

http://www.adm.uwaterloo.ca/infosec/Policies/policy71.htm

In addition, the University also provides a concise guideline and checklist for students at:

http://www.adm.uwaterloo.ca/infosec/students/studentmisconduct.htm

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Grading Scale

Courses in the Faculty of Arts are graded according to the following scale:

Letter Grade

Numeric Value

Description

 

 

 

A+

90-100

Exceptional

A

85-89

Excellent

A-

80-84

Excellent

B+

77-79

Very good

B

73-76

Good

B-

70-72

Good

C+

67-69

Competent

C

63-66

Fairly Competent

C-

60-62

Fairly Competent

D+

57-59

Passing

D

53-56

Barely passing

D-

50-52

Barely passing

F+

42-49

Marginally failing

F

35-41

Failing

F-

0-34

Failing

 According to this system, a grade of C-, C, or C+ indicates that the evaluated work meets the basic requirements of the assignment.  In order to achieve a mark above C+, the assignment must demonstrate superior characteristics such as a sophisticated understanding of the topic, an awareness or ability to use more advanced methodologies, a creative approach, etc.

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Deadlines:

The instructor imposes a five per cent late penalty for each day after the due date on all assignments.  This includes week-ends and holidays.

10 September Lectures begin
25 September Research topic selection
28 September Drop, no penalty period ends
16 October Reading logs #1 due
13 November Reading logs #2 due
3 December Lectures end
4 December Historiographical essay due

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Illness and Missed Tests:

The University of Waterloo Examination Regulations are available online at:

http://www.registrar.uwaterloo.ca/exams/ExamRegs.pdf

Student travel plans are not acceptable grounds for granting an alternative final examination period.

The University acknowledges that, due to the pluralistic nature of the University community, some students may, on religious grounds, require alternative times to write tests and examinations.

If a student has a test/examination deferred due to acceptable medical evidence, he/she normally will write the test/examination at a mutually convenient time, to be determined by the course instructor.

The regulations stipulate that a medical certificate presented in support of an official petition for relief from normal academic requirements must provide all of the information requested on the “University of Waterloo Verification of Illness” form or it will not be accepted. This form can be obtained from Health Services or at:

 http://www.healthservices.uwaterloo.ca/Health_Services/VERIFICATION%20OF%20ILLNESS.html

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Special Needs:

Students with documented or suspected disabilities (i.e., physical, learning, or sensory disabilities or chronic medical conditions) are encouraged to contact the Office for Persons with Disabilities (OPD) to determine eligibility for their services. OPD is located in Needles Hall 1132, 888-4567 ext. 5082.

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Course Files:

Week 1: Murder Trial Transcript

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